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Check Out Our Andreas Capellanus's Art of Courtly Love Essay

Courtly love was portrayed as a special form of love, which had a connection to the romantic thoughts and actions of upper class women and men. To a certain extent, the courtly love portrayed in the Art of Courtly Love was an illustration of a social convention and incredible in several aspects. For instance, the marriages among the upper class citizens were usually arranged marriages planned to achieve certain economic and political goals. Within such marriages, love was more of the exception than the rule. Wives and husbands were expected to look for love outside marriage in case they needed romantic love. Courtly love was perceived as inherently centered on adulterous love found in romantic relationships between women and men, who could not get married due to various reasons. For example, Andrea indicated that no man must pursue the love of a nun; otherwise, he would be despised by the community and treated as an abominable beast. On the other hand, the clergy men’s situation was a bit different as Andrea says that they ought not to seek love as they can be forced to renounce the delights of the flesh, and free themselves from bodily filth.

Knighthood theme

The theme of knighthood is well portrayed in the most well regarded knights on two round table. On one side of the table is Sir Gawain characterized by the faithful abstinence for the truthfulness and loyalty to the noble lord. On the other table, the shameful and deceitful characters and passionate love from Sir Lancelot to the queen. These features are illustrated in Malory and Marie de France works. This theme is quite controversial and a popular subject. The absolving and crusades of the sins of Templar contributed to the resistance to chastity. The celibacy of Christian values and religious bigotry also contributed to the theme of knighthood and its controversial differences.

Compare and contrast Guinevere in Chretien and Malory

In the medieval culture, experienced struggles with the otherness of women and simultaneous humanity, characterized by gender ideologies, which were highly contradictory and inconsistent. This aspect is clearly evident in the portrayal of Guinevere by Malory and Chrétien. Chrétien was the first author to describe Guinevere in an adulterous and courtly relationship with Lancelot, who treated her like a saint. Guinevere successfully employed her diplomatic skills with both King Bademagus and Sir Kay (Parry 47). On the other hand, Malory described Guinevere as fickle and involved in a courtly affair that fueled the eventual downfall of the kingdom. Guinevere was, however, a spiritual advisor and was full of sympathy, especially through her inability to have children. Being a woman involved in a courtly relationship, she served on a pedestal with her whim translating into the law of Lancelot, even though she cuckolded the king and her husband. She became a fictional queen in the most powerful country, in the Western world, even if she failed to produce an heir and had no direct political power. The sad end of Authurian world.

Malory uses drama to describe the scene of double death of Arthur and his son, Mordred, who was to blame for Arthur’s death. Modred used a sword to pierce through the Author’s chest while Arthur used a spear to kill Mordred. They both try to kill one another using their own hands and efforts. However, Arthur does not die immediately but transported to the chapel where he dies an honorable death. The sad end of Arthur is portrayed in the way he son causes his downfall. He lies on the dirty floor with blood streaming from all over his body. Author died in honor of his fallen counterparts. His sad end comes after coming from a respectful root and character.

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