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Check Out Our The Great Generals of the American Civil War Essay

Mexican war begun in 1845, when Texas and Mexico started to dispute about the location of the border they shared. Texas insisted that the border should lie south of the Rio Grande, whereas Mexico insisted the border to be north. The U.S. confronted Mexico’s possession of the land between the Nueces and Rio GrandeRivers. Between 1846 and 1848, U.S. forces attacked Mexico, and California. The Great Generals who served in the Mexican War included General Zachary Taylor, General David Twiggs, General Winfield Scott, General William Worth, and General John Wool. A number of Civil War Generals who served with a difference in the Mexican War include Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Stonewall Jackson, Ambrose Burnside, George Meade, Jefferson Davis, Winfield Scott, George McClellan, General Sumner, among others. This paper will discuss the issue concerning the Great Generals of the Civil War that served in the Mexican War.

Discussion

As a military commander, General Zachary Taylor is differentiated by his abilities of the highest order. When the Mexican army crossed the Rio Grande in May 1846, Taylor and his troop compelled the Mexican soldiers to reverse. On May 8 and 9, Taylor with his 4, 300 troops conquered larger Mexican forces at the battle at Palo Alto as well as Resaca de la Palma. As a result, he was promoted to Major General; this was the commencement of the Mexican War. After conquering the Mexican army in May 1846, Zachary was assigned the task of attacking Mexico and taking over a portion of its land. During the late September, they went through the city of Monterrey, and subsequent to three days of combating the Mexican troops, Taylor won. This was attributed to his skillful command, foresight, and his indomitable firmness in maintaining his character to the end.

General David Twiggs, the oldest officer of the old army, to adopt arms for the confederacy was born in Georgia in 1790. At the beginning of the Mexican War, his regiment formed a part of the army of occupation. On 8th May 1846, he led the right wing of the army and on the following day, after distinguishing himself in the battle, he was delegated with the arrangements for the replacement of prisoners. His outstanding service and conduct in the Mexican War granted him the rank of Brevet Major General. At the beginning of the Mexican War, his regiment created a part of the army of occupation; and in every duty he performed, he was noted as the most talented and intrepid officer.

General Winfield Scott is also well-renowned for leading the American forces to victory in the Mexican War. Beginning with a landing at Vera Cruz in 1847, Scott marched speedily inland, overcame larger Mexican forces, and took the enemy capital in a lightning campaign. General Winfield Scott together with General Zachary Taylor targeted on Northern Mexico.  Joining forces with a separate U.S. army, they conquered New Mexico, despite of Mexico’s attempt to stop them. In March 1847, General Scott landed a powerful force at Veracruz, captured the fort there and begun to shift toward Mexico City. The battles of Molino del Rey and Chapultupec were principally violent since there were the last defenses of Mexico City. General Scott’s army defeated the Mexican forces in both battles.

General William Jenkins Worth (1794-1849), a proud and argumentative officer, differentiated himself for courage during the Mexican War when he served under General Winfield Scott. Throughout the Mexican War, he fought under Taylor, followed by Scott. He was involved in capturing Veracruz and engaged in the battles of Churubusco as well as Molino del Rey. Moreover, he headed the attack upon Mexico City through the gate of San Cosme. He is renowned for his notable actions at Monterrey and his commitment in the major battles in the Valley of Mexico.

In the Mexican War, General John Wool was the third-highest ranking officer who served a prominent role in the Mexican War. His organizational skills were tested when the United States practiced for war with Mexico in 1856. In less than six weeks, Wool had 12,000 armed and trained men all set for the field. He then hired and equipped 3,000 extra men for his own command and marched them overland 900 miles to reach General Taylor’s army in due course for the battle of Buena Vista. In the remaining duration of the Mexican War, he served as Taylor’s second-in-command. Due to his exemplary efforts, he was promoted after the war and given control of the Department of the East as Major-General.

In the Mexican-American War, General Stephen Kearny was a Commander of the Army of the West. He led an army of 1,500 tough frontiersmen and regulars west from FortLeavenworth toward Santa Fe. He tricked and intimated the New Mexico’s governor, who escaped southward. Kearny’s army dwelt in Santa Fe on August 18 without firing a shot, then, after receiving supports, he left a small occupation force and separated the rest of his troops into two groups. He led forth a voyage that later paved the outcome of America’s Victory.

Conclusion

The Mexican War lasted only twenty-six months from its initial engagement, through the departure of American troops. It was a testing ground for a generation of the U.S. army leaders who were promoted to the General rank after undertaking the first major invasion of another country. As a result, this paved the way for America’s victory after winning a series of significant conventional battles and seizing almost half of Mexico’s territory. The Mexican War will always be remembered for changing the history of the United States.

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